"...IF YOU FOLLOW YOUR BLISS, DOORS WILL OPEN FOR YOU THAT WOULDN'T HAVE OPENED FOR ANYONE ELSE." - Joseph Campbell

"SOMETIMES ON THE WAY TO YOUR DREAM, YOU GET LOST AND FIND A BETTER ONE." - Lisa Hammond

"IT IS POSSIBLE AT ANY AGE TO DISCOVER A LIFELONG DESIRE YOU NEVER KNEW YOU HAD." - Robert Brault


"IT'S NEVER TOO LATE TO BE WHO YOU MIGHT HAVE BEEN." - George Eliot

"WE DID NOT CHANGE AS WE GREW OLDER. WE JUST BECAME MORE CLEARLY OURSELVES." - Lynn Hall

"GO CONFIDENTLY IN THE DIRECTION OF YOUR DREAMS! LIVE THE LIFE YOU HAVE IMAGED." - Henry David Thoreau

Sunday, November 20, 2011

* Nostalgic Sundays *


Since we had our family Thanksgiving yesterday, I've been trying to think back all those years to my childhood Thanksgivings. At first I found it rather odd that I couldn't seem to remember anything really specific about them. Years ago, though, I heard that the best memories children have aren't those extravagant birthday or Christmas gifts, nor those vacations to Disney World, but they're the ones about snuggling at bedtime and having a book read to them, or the impromptu singing and dancing that their parents did when they heard a certain song on the radio.


I'm fairly certain when I was really young, like four and five years old, my older sisters brought a friend home for Thanksgiving dinner. They were in college at that time and there were always a few students who couldn't go home for the holiday, so they were welcomed at our house.

The only other thing I remember at the moment is that us "kids," my brother Mike and me, were each given one of the turkey legs, the drumsticks. They seemed as big as my arm and I couldn't even finish eating mine.

We didn't live near any other family members, so we never spent Thanksgiving at a relative's home.  But I was perfectly happy with My family and My home, and never felt like I was missing anything.


(As I've mentioned before, these happy memories are from the years before my parents split up.Things changed after that.)

“We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude.” –Cynthia Ozick



17 comments:

  1. OH, I love thinking back on childhood memories. I definitely can remember Thanksgivings at my grandparents. They lived only a few blocks away, but going there was always a treat. There usually was other extended family as well.

    How sad it was for me when I was 15 and my parents made a cross-country move. Gone were those beloved Thanksgivings!!

    Thanks for sharing.

    Love,
    Patti

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  2. We only had family, grandparents and siblings. Now I try to include someone who doesn't have family close by or who are elderly or shut in.
    Mom always made a roasted duck for my grandfather with oyster dressing. Two things we would not eat as kids. But I still can remember the pink Damask tablecloth and napkins. The only one mom had. The dishes were mismatched but the table still looked festive. I still have the dime store berry bowl mom put homemade cranberry sauce in.~Ames

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  3. We went to my grandma's house, about six miles out in the country. Grandma always made a meat loaf for one of my uncles, who would not eat fish or fowl.

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  4. You are right. It's the simple things that stick in our memory.

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  5. Although we had traditional Thanksgivings, usually the day started with quail hunting at dawn. I always associate the holiday with quail, bird dogs, brown canvas clothes, and sometimes we had fried quail instead of turkey.

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  6. I love turkey drumsticks. They had them at the fair here this summer and I had to get one. It's such a reminder of slower times. Hope you had a great Thanksgiving!

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  7. We typically did an enormous extended-family type Thanksgiving at Grandma's house. You know, the kind where the adults are all at one big table and the kids are at another, largely unsupervised. By kid world standards, that was a much preferred arrangement.

    Pat
    Critter Alley

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  8. Hi Becky. Hope you are well. I also like thinking back on childhood memories, and I was blessed with a lot of love during my growing up years. I agree entirely that it is the little things that remain in childrens' minds, which can only be a good thing.

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  9. I guess we all cherish those childhood memories. Glad you hold on to yours, even if things changed later on.

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  10. Typical of me, what I remember about our wonderful Thanksgivings is the food! And that old, white-with-pink flowers china with scalloped edges.

    My mom was and is one heck of a cook.

    =)

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  11. Yes, I'd agree. It's those simple quiet moments, in our own homes, that we really cherish. Especially holiday moments. Hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving dinner this weekend, with lots of yummy leftovers :)

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  12. That's interesting Becky, because I can't recall any Thanksgiving's when I was younger. Total blank there. Weird.

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  13. Mmmm...I have wonderful Thanksgiving memories. I wish I knew then how much hard work my mom put into those memories. I certainly appreciate it now that I'm the one standing in the kitchen. But I hope my children have wonderful memories as well. . .even if they don't have full appreciation yet. :)

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  14. I hope your family Thanksgiving was great! Especially the pies. :) And I think you're totally right-- it's the little moments, not the extravagant ones-- that really mean the most.

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  15. Oh, childhood memories... now I'm all nostalgic myself.
    We don't have a large family, so holiday dinners never include more than six people. Wonder how that will change if/when I get married ;)

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  16. Thank you all SO MUCH for stopping and sharing some of YOUR memories, too. I appreciate every one of you and I'm "thankful" to know you!

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  17. Thanksgiving was really nice this year because of all the family, his, and mine, and two days of cooking and feasting, and now there are lots of yummy leftovers to make quick suppers. I have six brothers and sisters, we were always close. With all the spouse's, kids,grandkids, inlaws, ex's, etc. it's quite exciting
    and raucous, when we all assemble. Then after 50 years my parent's split, can you believe it? Now the family is divided, part of the fallout. I'm praying we will all come back together soon. Also,so many of my sisters, nieces, nephew,even my daughter have to work on Thanksgiving Day, they are nurses, cops, postal employees, etc. So we work around it and get together day after, or whenever we can! I hope to have many little Christmas gatherings, especially with the grandkids!
    Blessings!

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